To help safety leaders develop own and others’ safety leadership skills this article introduces the Green-Jakobsen Safety I’s model™. In short the overriding purpose of the model is to provide shipping companies and its safety leaders with 5 safety culture virtues. Find out what those 5 virtues are.

We have said it before and we will say it again: Safety excellent organisations aren’t just lucky. They have leaders who show safety leadership, accept and understand their role as ‘safety culture developers’, have a clear idea of what they want to achieve and how they can achieve it. Also they understand that the achievement of a strong and mature safety culture depends on the individual and organisational safety leadership capacity of the company.

All great countries and organisations have had great leaders. Typically these leaders have been capable of expressing a vision and capable of motivating those around him/her to work in the direction set to achieve the defined company vision. However, not all ‘leaders per position’ have the ability to set the direction for safety. They depend on others to help them define direction and how to achieve the set goals. Green-Jakobsen Safety I’s™

To help safety leaders develop own and others safety leadership skills this article introduces the Green-Jakobsen Safety I’s model™. In short the overriding purpose of the model is to provide shipping companies and its safety leaders with 5 safety culture virtues that – in order to develop a mature and strong safety culture – have to and can be directed, decided, cultivated, monitored, corrected and shaped by its leaders.

The Safety I's model is to provide shipping companies and its safety leaders with 5 safety culture virtues that can be directed, decided, cultivated, monitored, corrected and shaped by its leaders.

The Green-Jakobsen Safety I’s™ have been developed as a result of own and others’ research. Our own research and experience has been tested during numerous safety leadership, learning and development projects, and the Green-Jakobsen Safety I’s™ has now become trademark protected. In short the Safety I’s™ can be described as both organisational and individual safety culture fundamentals that are applicable for any organisation where safety is an issue. These are:

INSIGHT
INFLUENCE
INNOVATION
INTERVENTION
INTEGRATION

The purpose of each ‘Safety I’ is to provide the safety leader with safety culture goals, possibilities and options. In short, the Safety I’s provide the safety leader with:

A shared perception of the behavioural traits to be possessed by all crew members
An understanding of what are believed to be important safety culture virtues
Safety culture direction
A simple safety maturity assessment tool
Legalised areas to be evaluated and developed by the safety leader
A safety culture terminology

The 5 Green-Jakobsen Safety I’s

Below a short description of the 5 Safety I’s has been prepared.

Insight refers to the extent to which every level of the organisation has the needed knowledge, understanding and application capacity to live a mature safety culture. The task of the safety leader is to ensure that the appropriate insight is present both at an organisational and individual level. More specifically Insight refers to ensuring an understanding and application of some of the following subjects:

Risk assessment and mitigation
Managing effective Tool box Talk
Situational awareness
Safety leadership
Good safety behaviour
Safety culture and maturity

Influence refers to the extent to which every level of the organisation has the needed understanding and appreciation on how they can influence the positive development of the safety culture. The task of the safety leader is to ensure that the organisation’s members influence each other in a positive way and are aware of how they do this. In this respect the safety leader shall show high role awareness and constantly work on own and others’ ability to become good safety culture carriers. They need to understand their responsibility as good role models and how they shall seek positive influence. More specifically Influence refers to the following subjects:

Role model understanding and appreciation
Safety communication
Safety leadership competencies
Giving feedback and showing safety assertiveness

Innovation refers to the extent to which every level of the organisation has an innovative approach towards safety and constant safety improvement by keeping an open mind for improvements, new perspectives, seeking for new solutions and by constantly being proactive. Innovation is driven by leaders who set direction, create the environment for innovation, define deadlines, make people accountable and motivate them to achieve their goals. More specifically Innovation refers to the following subjects:

Preparing and implementing e.g. safety action plans – objective setting
Pulling and pushing to ensure proactive safety improvements
Management of change – embedding change
Situational awareness
Problem solving techniques

Intervention refers to the extent to which every level of the organisation understands and appreciates the importance of an intervention culture, and intrinsically intervenes constructively when observing unsafe acts and conditions. The safety leader has to ensure that interventions are legalised by everybody. More specifically Intervention refers to the following subjects:

Intervention and feedback culture
Feedback techniques
Objection management
Safety barrier tracking
Just and fair culture understanding

Integration refers to the extent to which every level of the organisation integrates the safety mindset, safety procedures and safety initiatives in every work processes, tasks, dispositions and strategies. The task of the safety leader is to ensure that safety awareness is anchored in any operation: e.g. ensuring that risk assessment is an integral part of work not just something done after the job has been done. More specifically Integration refers to the following subjects:

Complete risk management/assessment in all work processes
Risk assessment integrated in management of change
Safety communication
Involvement of all management commitment – line responsibility
Structured competence management process
Safety applied through performance management principles
Evaluation of safety competencies through competence management

The Safety I’s™ demand safety leadership

Nothing comes for free. Safety excellent organisations demand leaders who can drive a process. This article provides direction, but getting people to embrace the 5 ‘Safety I’s’ depends on the interpersonal leadership capabilities of each leader. Despite the fact that not all leaders are leaders who will be ‘going into the history books’, any manager or officer with safety responsibilities can develop their safety leadership capabilities (and most properly also need to do so).

The 5 Safety I’s – if applied properly – will help leaders develop their safety culture. Safety culture demands strong safety leadership. For more information contact: www.green-jakobsen.com.

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Erik Green
Erik Green
Managing Director and Partner
Copenhagen

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